Wednesday, June 19, 2013

6 Blogging Tips for Your Website Ya'll




A website has several key elements that work together for its success, namely design, structure, content, maintenance, and SEO optimization. As we seek out information the social standard in today’s society is to Google it, or type in a word or phrase around what you are seeking. This is the importance of SEO optimization. You can have the best website in the world but if it is never found, it is worthless. Design and structure piggyback off each other providing a visually rich but branded experience when readers visit the site. With the use of any technology, the backend coding needs ongoing maintenance. Just like the internet, a website is constantly evolving and requires updates to continue to be up to its highest value.

One of the most effective ways to maintain a high SEO ranking is through regular blogging, or content creations. By using SEO keywords and phrases strategically placed throughout posts and when tagging posts is how to continually optimize a site. Many businesses find blogging to be intimidating in curating content. Dan Zarrella shared these tips on content creation for blogging: pick a niche and continue to share relevant news and tips about it, post consistently, mix up length of your posts, and include media.

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

What is Social Media Marketing Anyway Yo?



Social Media Confusion
  In order to understand the ACT method, defined as attract, convert, and transform  one has to have an understanding of online marketing. Online marketing differs greatly than traditional marketing used over the last few hundred years. With the invention of the internet, the marketing industry has been presented with more challenges and more opportunities at the fastest rate ever in the industry.

Unlike in traditional advertising online marketing is a two-way conversation. Take for example a commercial, in this the company sends a message that is simply viewed and gets the product or service seen. In contrast, a blog post with a review of a product that is shared via social media created multiple outlets for conversations. Such as in, the comments section of the blog or in response on the social media threads.

 Social media marketing is not as fast at getting products, services, and brands in front of people as it's thought to be. Social media marketing campaigns that are successful are those with long terms goals and quarterly reviews that understand they are cultivating relationship. It's not about a one way conversation like traditional marketing. It's a two way conversation. How do you feel when no one listens to you?





Bri Clark
Social Ghoster Marketing Strategist, Author, Speaker, Social Media/ Platform Consultant


(208)761-0319 
belleconsult.com

  
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Wednesday, May 22, 2013

What Season Am I?

I'm pleased as punch to get my own personal color analysis by Sue McCartney of Your Color. She is an image consultant with over 20 years experience and a client list to prove it. But what I'm even more excited about is we get to have a contest too.



All you  have to do is guess what season I am correctly and leave your answer in the comments.

First one who does wins a lipstick pen and a new universal lipstick crayon. Universal means it looks FABULOUS ON EVERYONE!

GO AHEAD! GUESS GUESS GUESS!! SPRING, SUMMER, AUTUMN OR SUMMER.

You can find more out bout Sue here http://yourcolor.us.






Bri Clark
Social Ghoster Marketing Strategist, Author, Speaker, Social Media/ Platform Consultant


(208)761-0319 
belleconsult.com


  
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google Plus YouTube

Sunday, May 5, 2013

So what’s it take to succeed as an indie author?

So what’s it take to succeed as an indie author?


[note: this article first appeared as part of the How to be a Good Writer series on the C.P. White Media Blog.]

Sales. God help us. My good friend Aaron Patterson once posted up a comment on Facebook about this: what’s it take to sell your book (basically)? I mean, some of us are selling and some of are not, and it’s not as if it’s cut and dried that the nonsellers are shitty writers. Pardon me, but come on. And there’s plenty of hot-selling total crapola out there. So it’s not simple.

Adding to the complexity is the free market, which I adore. The rise of the eBook has been confounding the Big Six publishers today in the same way that Napster and iTunes changed just about everything in regard to the music business a while back. Well…when I say everything…the point is that Bob Dylan was right about how times change, but only insofar as they don’t really, which was King Solomon’s counterbalancing bit of sagacity.

Aaron and I secretly agree that for the business-minded author, the entrepreneurial, the indie author…pssst: there’s really no need for a publisher. The dirty little secret is that the Big Six will expect you to work just as hard for them as if you were going it alone, and in exchange for that gigantic favor they will be taking about 85% of the pot, thanks. At least. I personally don’t want to shove against that wall. Someone else can shove it, if you get my meaning.

The facts, therefore, have been distilled down to these: editing, cover design, publishing, and marketing strategy. Those are the things that matter most, and the things that any competent publisher (even if he’s just a one-man operation, i.e. an indie writer) will spend the bucks on. Let’s have a look at ‘em one at a time.

Editing is the process, often painful, whereby you as the author pay large amounts of cash so that your work can be pulled apart by someone wiser than thou. It’s also so that you can be emotionally abused about it. Okay, I’m (mostly) kidding. A great editor will do that so nicely that you’ll catch yourself saying, “Thank you, sir, may I have another.” Remember that editing isn’t just spelling and grammar; it’s content, the creative bits, pacing, character development, plot, and so on. It’s my personal opinion that the best editors are a one-stop shop. Spelling and grammar are fixed pretty easily, either by Word itself or by the conscientious author. Anyway, editors who only do spelling and grammar are called proofreaders, not editors. And if you’d like to get in touch with me aboutediting your work, please do.

Okay, covers. Cover design is something at which I suck. Okay, that’s not fair, but let’s say that a guy struggles when he lacks tools and experience sometimes. Just being honest. So few authors are double-edged swords; able to produce literary and graphic excellence. I once posted on Facebook a cover I did for my novella The Marsburg Diary, alongside another cover that was professionally done, and asked people to vote. It was something on the order of 20:1 against mine. Not to say that I can’t learn eventually, but for now, I’ll be leaving it to the professionals. I’d counsel you to do the same. It’s almost impossible to spend too much on a good cover. Don’t be afraid to “focus group” it with your friends, either.

Sunday, April 28, 2013

Get yourself out there

Get yourself out there

 

[note: this article first appeared as part of the How to be a Good Writer series on the C.P. White Media Blog.]

Unless you have tried and failed at something, you might not get it. If you’ve never stood your ground even once and told people exactly what you’re thinking, you probably can’t relate to what I’m about to say. If you’ve never tried to create something truly personal, and then taken the huge risk of allowing people to see it, read it, experience it…then you can’t know how it feels. If you can’t look yourself in the mirror and say, “I have something to say,” and mean it, well, you probably don’t know what I’m talking about.

I’m talking about putting yourself out there; in this case as a writer. It might seem difficult to write a book, especially for those who never have, and it is. But it’s even more difficult to finish it and let it go. Out into the wild. Where people are free to love it or hate it. But I gotta tell you: it’s worth the risk. It is totally worth the risk.

Aaron Patterson and I released Airel a couple of springs ago. And then we re-released it last November, with a few improvements. And we have more improvements in store. That first release was the result of about a year’s worth of work. Yep. That much. and like I said, work on that series is ongoing. And as hard as the writing and editing and revising process sometimes is, it doesn’t compare to how difficult it can be emotionally to publish the Work—and allow people into what amounts to a very private inner sanctum: the imagination of the author.

Sunday, April 21, 2013

How to submit for publication (or do it yourself, thanks very much)

How to submit for publication (or do it yourself, thanks very much)


[note: this article first appeared as part of the How to be a Good Writer series on the C.P. White Media Blog.]

How to submit for publication: it’s the question you probably wonder about when you turn out the lights and you’re trying to get to sleep. But it’s not one very many authors are asking out loud these days, and for good reason. It’s because of self-publishing. It’s because of technology. We might assume the world has changed for good. But publishers aren’t going anywhere. After all, Sony Music weathered the rise of Napster and iTunes; Harper Collins and Penguin aren’t just going to roll over and die. So then… you might want to know, after all, “How do I submit for publication?”

My best answer to the question? Don’t. You’re going to work your keester off whether you’re independent or traditionally published. The rate of pay, though, is wildly different. I’ve said it before: You don’t need a publisher. Not these days. And not, certainly, for what you’ll get out of making a deal with the Devil, which amounts to about 15% on the high end, and that’s if Beelzebub likes you. Or if you drive a harder bargain than Faust. See, publishers used to be able to justify their gargantuan takes. After all, there was the cost of print, the risk they were taking, the rent on their palatial Manhattan offices; the whole enterprise of publishing to begin with. Plus they were the gatekeepers of the industry. Without a competitive alternative, monopolies tend to do as they see fit, and to hell not only with the consequences but with everyone else as well.